Bath Room DIY Tips 'n Tricks

The Sophisticated Black Door

November 7, 2014
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Interior doors are often forgotten when decorating a home and typically left white, but no one can deny that a black door adds an element of style and sophistication. In my own home, the inside of my front door is black, the inside of my back door is black, and now the entire bathroom door is black. The plan is to do the same for all of the doors in the house once I replace the hollow core doors with solid, 6-panel doors.

Take a look at these beautiful options when considering painting your doors black. Click on the photo to view the source.

 

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These bedroom doors are a matte black.

 

These doors are standard doors you can purchase from a hardware store. See how the black, semi-gloss paint and hardware set them off as so sophisticated.

These doors are standard doors you can purchase from a hardware store. Look at how the black, semi-gloss paint and hardware set them off as sophisticated.

 

Doors with mullions are like picture frames. The black sets off the "picture" of the outdoors.

Doors with mullions are like picture frames. The black sets off the “picture” of the outdoors.

 

Imagine this room with white doors. Can you see how these black doors boost the style and sophistication factor of the space?

Imagine this room with white doors. Can you see how these black doors boost the style and sophistication factor of the space?

 

I appreciate black doors any way they come (matte, satin, semi-gloss, gloss), but I painted my first black door with Glidden Trim & Door paint in “high gloss” so I’m going to use a high gloss finish throughout the rest of the house for consistency. Glidden Trim & Door paint is a gel paint with a self-leveling (meaning no brush marks) and no drip formula. If you are going “high gloss” this paint works pretty well.

This paint can be used for raw wood, steel and aluminum, galvanized metal, vinyl or PVC. I won’t explain the prep for each of those surfaces as I’ve only had experience with my metal front and back door and my raw wood interior door.

I purchased a 6-panel solid core door from a salvage yard a few months ago for this bathroom project. The door wasn’t in perfect shape, but I knew the dark paint would help cover the imperfections. I started by cleaning the door thoroughly with a damp cloth to get all the grime off, then what little varnish was left on the door, I lightly sanded and wiped down with a damp cloth again. Let dry thoroughly.

 

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Yes, all that dirt on my cloth is from the door! Ick.

Next, I filled in all the scratches and chips with wood filler.

 

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Let the wood filler dry completely before sanding. Once sanded, you are ready to paint! Always, always make sure you paint with a high quality brush. My absolute favorite is a Purdy XL-Dale 2″ angle brush. When applying the Glidden Trim & Door paint, glob it on THICK then smooth it out with your paint brush. Be sure that on your first coat to cover the entire surface so that no tiny part of the door shows through. I made the mistake of missing little specs here and there, and when I went back the next day to paint over those spots I quickly realized that that small new layer of paint wasn’t going to blend with the rest of the door. It almost looked like a “patch” of paint placed over the spot since this gel formula is very thick. I’ll admit I left it that way and am hoping no one but myself notices. I would have had to put a whole other layer of paint on the door just to cover up these tiny specks.

 

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A basic tip with all paint, but especially Glidden Trim & Door paint, is to brush with the grain of the wood.You can see in the picture above and below where the paint starts and stops. Had I painted the center horizontal piece of wood all the way to the edge of the door, it would instantly look “off.” Our brain and eye subconsciously know how a panel door should look and where the pieces/panels start and stop. This goes for metal doors that don’t have wood panels as well. MAKE up the panels when painting these doors.

 

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With any door that has raised panels or shaker panels the panels should be painted first like in the photo above. It’s much easier to mess up the paint you’ve already made perfectly smooth on the rest of the door if you choose to paint the inside panels second.

I will agree that the Glidden Trim & Door paint is “no-drip,” but as for no brush strokes and self-leveling, I’m not entirely convinced. I can see the subtle “ripples” of my strokes on each door I’ve painted, but not enough to bother me or make them look bad. However, that’s all the more reason to follow the technique of painting with the grain and stopping at the edge of each wood panel piece that makes up the whole door. See my bathroom door below for example.

 

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I’m satisfied with the product and will continue to use it throughout the house. With greater experience comes greater knowledge, so as I continue to use this product and more tips come to mind, I’ll be sure to update you!

Whatever method you use to paint your doors, go for the black door. . . you won’t regret the instant sophistication added to your space! What is your door color preference? Would you ever consider painting your doors black?

Happy weekend, Folks!

 

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This is not a paid endorsement. All opinions are 100% my own.

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